This gathering explores formats to address, fabricate, discuss, and practice social transformation. It invites participants to create a common space for our radical imagination(s) and social justice that goes beyond a skill-share for radical organizers. Radical Imagination invites us to engage in a profound critique of what seems obvious (radical = that goes to the roots of something) and to explore alternative ways of living together - producing, loving, shaping spaces and time, inhabiting the land, working, using, struggling. It is an appeal to decolonize social relations and the dominant imaginaries that justify oppression and injustice, as well as an effort to instill anti-capitalist praxis. Radical Imagination is not just about dreaming alternative futures. It lures us into embodying alternatives.

April 3-4, 2020

Westminster House

101 NW 23rd St

Corvallis, OR 97330

Our conference will be hosted in an accessible building with automatic door entrance and ramp.

Our organizers are in the process of securing CART captioning support. We will have on-site child care and encourage participants to bring children. Contact our organizers at oregonradicalimagination@gmail.com

From the conference archives:

adrienne maree brown on Pleasure Activism: The Politics of Feeling Good

Previous Keynotes

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2019 SPONSORS

OSU Center for Civic Engagement

OSU Graduate School

OSU Office of Institutional Diversity

OSU Black Graduate Students Association

OSU University Housing and Dining

OSU Area Councils

OSU Muslim Students Association

OSU Diversity and Cultural Engagement

OSU Spring Creek Project

 

2018 SPONSORS

Jamila Osman

 

Jamila Osman is a Somali poet and essayist from Portland, Oregon. A public school teacher for many years, she is now an MFA student at the University of Iowa. A VONA/Voices alumna, she has received fellowships from Caldera, Djerassi, and the MacDowell Colony. She was co-winner of the 2019 Brunel International African Poetry Prize, and 2019 winner of The Adirondack Review’s 46er Prize for Poetry. Some of her work can be found in The New York Times, Al Jazeera, BOAAT, Diagram, and other places.


She is currently working on a memoir chronicling her parents’ displacement from Somalia, and the death of her sister Ayan in 2014. It is a meditation on the way trauma and memory are passed on across geography and between generations.


She tweets at @j__osman

2020 Keynote Speaker at #OSRI3